Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Developing Your Head Voice - "Building Powerful High Notes"

If you’ve only experienced defeat and resignation with the weak high notes, then you’re certainly not alone. So don’t fret. It may take time to achieve, but it certainly isn’t impossible. Ideally, to get this right, you’ll want to find your head voice and slide downward through your pharyngeal resonator and into your chest voice. In this article I’m going to explain how you can quickly do this anyplace you like, to train your voice anytime you want.  So let’s take a closer look at some quick and easy ways to building powerful high notes.

When training the voice, I particularly find working with the “I” vowel to be a really effective way to focus the voice deep into your head voice without losing power. I would often ask students that attend private lessons in my studio, to do one of my warm-up exercises combining the consonant “N” with the vowel “I” to project a “NI NI” sound up the scale. Another way, obviously, is to simply do the scales with just the “I” vowel. But it is crucial that you feel the sensation in front of your face. Like singing in the mask, as it is often referred. Another pretty simple strategy is to hit your intended high note with an “I” vowel, and then to hold that note very briefly and quickly slide downward into your chest voice through your mix voice, with what sounds like an “IYA”, while ensuring the vowel “A” hits your lower register.

Powerful high notes can be developed over time. The more you do the exercises, the stronger and more powerful your entire range becomes. And so I would strongly advise that you persevere and never lose sight of your goals. I’ve seen a lot of people throw in the towel first hurdle, and yet they would continue working hard to achieve their dreams as singers WITHOUT the training. And hence it becomes a series of struggles, and total dependency on recording studios to define your sound with the aid of excessive and oftentimes annoying auto tuning. As an artist, take pride in being able to stand alone and gain the respect that you deserve for being the true master of your craft. I do hope that these handy tips have given you additional training to add to your daily vocal training routine. Feel free to download vocal training exercises here.

You are the instrument, learn to sing like a pro!

JOETT

Vocal Coach & Author
"Letters from a Vocal Coach"
Private Singing Lessons
BUY Online Singing Lessons Course 


Friday, August 14, 2015

Developing Your Head Voice - "Low Head Voice"

If you were under the impression that the head voice was only about singing the high notes, then in this article I want to talk about the low head voice. In my previous article I explained a little more about head voice versus falsetto. When you flip into falsetto, the body is basically, anatomically, kicking in the defense mechanism by splitting apart the vocal cords to protect them from being damaged from all the weight and strain caused by a raised larynx… which in essence, is like you trying to shout your way into higher notes. Whilst out jogging on the beach today, I spotted several youngsters practicing their singing by shouting verses of a song over and over again—which is commonplace in Dar es salaam—and I strongly advise against it. I’ll have to write another article (perhaps in Kiswahili) to highlight the disadvantages of voice training in this fashion, but for now, I want us to take a closer look at the low head voice and how developing that area can bring about tremendous benefits to your singing.

There are a lot of benefits to the low head voice. In terms of how it sounds, it’s kind of like a cartoon sort of voice, if you had to describe literally. When you develop the lower part of your head voice, it gives your chest voice something to blend and to mix with. So that’s one of the additional benefits of working the lower head voice. It also helps to lower the larynx. A lot of problems untrained singers encounter are the direct result of the raised larynx—which causes all of the strain and pain that you don’t want, and gets in the way of you delivering your notes in a more professional and relaxed manner. So developing this part of your head voice, no doubt, will be a great help.

So let’s take a closer look at what exercises to do to help you develop your low head voice. One way to do this would be to work with “MA” with any scale that you do. It’s always a good idea to learn to replace some of the exercises on the scales, with alternative workouts that help fix certain problems. For example, you could be doing the arpeggios, chromatic, and descending scales with “MA”. Obviously, you don’t want to sing in this cartoon type tone, but for training purposes it is extremely good for developing your low head voice area. I do hope that these handy tips have given you additional training to add to your daily vocal training routine. Feel free to download vocal training exercises here.

You are the instrument, learn to sing like a pro!

JOETT

Vocal Coach & Author
"Letters from a Vocal Coach"
Private Singing Lessons
BUY Online Singing Lessons Course

Developing Your Head Voice - "Head Voice vs. Falsetto"

If you’ve often wondered what the difference is between head voice and falsetto, then you’re no different to a lot of other people out there who ask themselves this very question. Once you’re able to identify the difference between the two, you will be able to immediately know where you are and never have to make a wild guess ever again. This article will expound a little bit about that to help you get a better understanding. So let’s talk about the head voice versus falsetto.

Many people don’t know the difference between head voice and falsetto. When your head voice is isolated, it’s hard to tell that from falsetto. Ideally, what you want is a good blend through your mix voice, using your pharyngeal resonator. But the difference is vocal cord closure. Falsetto is breathy and devoid of vocal cord closure and you feel it more in your throat. And what’s more, it doesn’t allow your voice to blend between registers. So actually, when you want to be sure where you are (falsetto or head voice), be sure to check if you can blend into your lower register. If you’re in falsetto, your voice will break; whereas if you’re in your head voice, you’ll blend straight into your chest voice with no cracks and breaks. That’s assuming you’ve had some voice training, of course.
For stylistic purposes falsetto is pretty cool. It works pretty well for effect, but to make the most of this more effectively would really depend on the mood of the song and the best way possible to deliver the song. Sometimes embellishment with a bit of falsetto can work wonders, and in some cases way better than head voice. Just be careful that you’re not substituting a high note you’re unable to hit, with falsetto. I believe a song has a life all its own, and that it tells a story. So let the song lead the way, so you can interpret the message in the best way possible.

You want your voice to be connected. Head voice gives you that connection. When you’re in your head voice you want to add a little bit of that mix, brassy resonance because it sounds heavier, fuller and more powerful. They’re both light, but falsetto is more hissy and airy, and would back off into a whisper; while head voice would back off into a quieter tone. I do hope that these handy tips have given you additional training to add to your daily vocal training routine. Feel free to download vocal training exercises here.

You are the instrument, learn to sing like a pro!

JOETT

Vocal Coach & Author
"Letters from a Vocal Coach"
Private Singing Lessons
BUY Online Singing Lessons Course


Friday, July 31, 2015

How to Develop Your Head Voice Using Your Pharyngeal Resonator

If like so many people around the world you have never really been able to find your head voice, this article will talk a little bit about the quickest way into your head voice without the cracks and the breaks. In layman’s terms, this article will aim to help you find your head voice so you can begin to expand your range. As you build up what is called your pharyngeal resonator, this technique will allow you to sing with more vocal freedom as you slide in between your head and chest registers. You’ll also begin to learn how to blend your head voice with your chest voice so they mix well into one. As you begin improving your head voice, you will begin experiencing a much more polished, professional sounding voice as you reach higher up in your vocal register, without straining or causing tension to your vocal cords. So what is this best kept secret, I hear you ask? Let’s begin by understanding the causes of this seemingly insurmountable problem, before we look at ways to resolve them.

The common tendency with a lot of people is to pull up their chest voice, which basically means shouting your way to your upper register. Ideally, you want to get into your head voice with that girth that projects a fuller voice. And the best way in is through your mix voice. Guys have a broader range of chest voice and a shorter range of head voice, whereas girls have a shorter range of chest voice and a broader range of head voice. Girls generally find it easier to find their head voice than guys, although both genders do have a certain amount of difficulty. So let’s take a much closer look at how to get into your head voice.

The pharyngeal sound is very beneficial for a lot of things, especially for discovering and getting into your head voice. The “NG” sound helps you keep your vocal cords together, the opposite of which is when they blow apart and you disconnect into falsetto. So here’s what you need to do. Breathe in to ensure you have sufficient breath to hold a note, and then begin the extended ascending slide “NG” sound which will seamlessly connect you to your head voice; and then open out to an “AA” vowel at the top of your range whilst you continue to hold that note. You’ll realize that the “NG” sound helps you get into your head voice without the cracks and the breaks. I do hope that these handy tips have given you additional training to add to your daily vocal training routine. Feel free to download vocal training exercises from my blog here!

You are the instrument, learn to sing like a pro!

JOETT

Vocal Coach & Author
"Letters from a Vocal Coach"
Private Singing Lessons
BUY Online Singing Lessons Course

Thursday, July 30, 2015

MAYUNGA NALIMI DEBUTS HIS ‘NICE COUPLE’ MUSIC VIDEO AND EPK ON TRACE URBAN ON 31 JULY 2015!

TRACE PRESS RELEASE JOHANNESBURG, JULY 29, 2015

Airtel TRACE Music Star 2015 winner Mayunga Nalimi releases the music video for his breakout single “Nice Couple”, set to air on TRACE Urban DStv 325 on 31 July 2015. 


Earlier this month, TRACE Music Star winner Mayunga Nalimi touched down in Johannesburg from his native country of Tanzania to embark on the new beginnings of a promising musical career since reigning supreme in Africa’s biggest ever talent search competition on 18 April 2015. 

Crowned by international megastar Akon and awarded with a grand prize that includes a record deal with Universal Music, Mayunga hit the ground running during his SA visit with a full-on music video production for his latest single “Nice Couple”, which was shot in Orlando East, “Nice Couple” is available for download on iTunes in 107 territories worldwide, as well as other online music sharing sites like Deezer, Beatport and Vevo. 



ABOUT TRACE 

TRACE is a leading urban and black entertainment group with activities in 180 countries. TRACE is a signature hub for black and urban entertainment content and offers TV channels, FM radios, mobile services, events etc. to millennial and young adults audiences. 

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

How to Prepare the Voice for a Studio Recording Session

If you have only done your studio recording sessions on a whim, running to the studio to listen to a beat that may tickle your fancy, and perhaps scribbling down some lyrics and jumping into the booth to record your vocals, then you will be amazed to discover that that isn’t how the professionals work. It takes a heck of a lot more to produce a record. This article will offer tips on how to first prepare the voice—your very own God given instrument needs to be readied to do the job—and what to look out for in a recording studio that will ensure you deliver a good vocal.

The more I hear stories about how people rush to studios unprepared, the more I want to reach out and help them understand the importance of getting well prepared. You’re going to be surprised how much more powerful and effective your vocal delivery will be when you do. So let’s begin.

There are numerous ways to compose a song. Your song can begin as an idea for a melody, for example, that develops into an entire song over time, with careful crafting. In this type of scenario, once you have what you want, you can begin to develop piano, acoustic guitar cords, or the beat to the song with the help of a fellow musician, if you’re not an instrumentalist yourself. The other way to craft a song, and this is probably the most common nowadays, is to get a producer to create a beat and then you would write the lyrics to it over time. I’ve repeated the words ‘over time’ for a reason. Don’t rush! Take your time to create something beautiful. The better the composition, the longer the shelf life of your song! Good songs last forever. Now let’s discuss preparing the voice, because this after all is the purpose of this article.

Nothing defeats the object more than relying on auto tune to fix your vocal flaws. Because it’s so demeaning, and you cannot reproduce that on a live set! So aim for being able to do a great job in the studio yourself, trust me, you’ll be proud of yourself for it. When you train your voice with the scales before you write the song, your ability to write a song automatically does a quantum leap from mediocre to pro because of it, for the simple reason that your voice knows a whole lot more—and that allows you to create something with a much broader vocal range.

And here’s what you need to look out for in a recording studio. When you have your headsets on, make sure you can hear your own voice properly. If you cannot hear what you’re doing, it will be at the expense of your vocal delivery. So have the producer set it up for you, and tweak it to perfection till you’re absolutely satisfied. If you’re the kind of person that desires vocal perfection but didn’t quite know how to go about achieving that, you can download free vocal exercises from my blog here.

You are the instrument, learn to sing like a pro!

JOETT

Vocal Coach & Author
"Letters from a Vocal Coach"
Private Singing Lessons
BUY Online Singing Lessons Course

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

How to Prepare the Voice for a Singing Audition

If you’re a little nervous or unsure of how best to prepare for an audition in order to succeed through the selection process, this article will give you tips on how to let go of your inhibitions and to train and prepare your voice for your singing audition in the right frame of mind and confidence to get the job done. The more you train, the more confident you’ll become and the better your chances of making the grade through auditions. And the same applies with preparing for a studio recording session, but I won’t be delving into that now. I will devote a full article on this topic in my next installment—next week.

Let’s assume you’ve never had proper voice training before. Well, there’s no better time than now to get started on a voice training program to help develop your vocal range. Ideally, I would recommend ten hours training, one hour a day spread over ten days, just doing the scales. That is the bare minimum your voice will need in preparation alone before you audition. And the best way to go about this is to begin your vocal training sessions with a breathing exercise before you move on to the vocal exercises. Once your vocals are all warmed up and tuned up, begin rehearsing the song you want to sing in the audition. You will be amazed how each time your vocals soar through the song with better pitch, range and vocal agility than in the previous session. That’s how powerful specific vocal exercises are for singers. And on the day of the audition, make sure you’ve warmed up your voice with a good one hour session at home, rehearsed the song you’re going to sing, and then keep your mouth shut. Yes, the last thing you want to do is to tax your voice to the very last minute. Give your voice a rest. It will come through for you in the end.

So I’m sure at this point you’re all eager to know what vocal exercises are the best to get started with. Well, let me tell you this. Ideally, you really need a combination of exercises to get you where you want to be as a singer. Even if you repeated arpeggios, for example, but changed the vowels each run; or if you also did the lip rolls and tongue trills on the same arpeggios. As to what you can do in terms of combinations, the sky truly is the limit. I’ve uploaded warm-up, arpeggios, chromatic and descending scales from my Learn to Sing with Joett Vocal Training CD Booster Program to Hulkshare.

You are the instrument, learn to sing like a pro!

JOETT

Vocal Coach & Author
"Letters from a Vocal Coach"
Private Singing Lessons
BUY Online Singing Lessons Course